Public Comment 2021

 

This page includes:

 

 

Public Comment Drafts

 

Public comment closed on Monday 18 January 2021 for:

  • The draft Revision of Technical Specification FPAA101D, Automatic Fire Sprinkler System Design and Installation - Drinking Water Supply
  • The draft Amendment of FPAA101H, Automatic Fire Sprinkler System Design and Installation - Hydrant Water Supply

 

 

PCD - FPAA101D-2021 Revision (cover image)

 

 

PCD - FPAA101H-2021 Amendment (cover image)

 

FPAA101D-2021 Revision

 

 

Pdf includes a clean copy (no mark-up) followed by a copy with changes identified (with mark-up)

 

 

FPAA101H-2021 (Amendment incorporated)

 

Pdf includes a clean copy (no mark-up) followed by a copy with changes identified (with mark-up)


This draft revision includes:

  • All changes to convert FPAA101D to the FPAA101H format to be more readable (changes accepted)
  • Additional changes to address stakeholder feedback (changes shown).

 

To see the changes for the conversion to the FPAA101H format, see this document here (note this document does not include the additional changes, only the changes for the conversion).

 

 

 


This is FPAA101H with the changes from the draft Amendment incorporated into the full Technical Specification so that the context of these changes can be readily understood.

 

There is also a draft standalone Amendment here, intended for people that already own a copy of FPAA101H. It includes only the changes from the draft Amendment.

 

Feedback is welcome on this standalone amendment too, but should be limited to editorial feedback on how the changes have been included in this standalone amendment (the content of the changes is as per the changes in the "Amendment incorporated" document).

 

 

Background to the draft FPAA101D Revision and FPAA101H Amendment

 

Since their publication in December 2018, and the subsequent adoption into the National Construction Code 2019 (effective 1 May 2019), FPA Australia has received feedback from a wide range of stakeholders involved in the implementation of systems to these Technical Specifications, including from product manufacturers; system designers and installers; water service authorities; regulators; and more.

 

Now that there are sufficient changes to warrant improvements to these Technical Specifications, FPA Australia has drafted the proposed revision to FPAA101D and amendment to FPAA101H.

 

 

FPAA101D Revision

 

There are two major changes in the draft revision of FPAA101D-one to address readability and another to address metering of the drinking water supply.

 

There were also changes to address updates to referenced standards and other minor issues.

 

Readability

 

We received much feedback on the difficulty of interpreting FPAA101D in its current format where it adopts and varies AS 2118.5, particularly as this results in two sets of clause numbers - one for FPAA101D (e.g. 1.0, 2.0, etc.) and another for the variations to AS 2118.5 (Clause 1.3.2, 2.5.3.1, etc.). As such, the first task in the revision was to revise FPAA101D to be in the FPAA101H format.

 

Essentially, where FPAA101D currently adopts AS 2118.5 and varies the requirements, in this draft revision of FPAA101D this is reversed. Like FPAA101H, this draft revision of FPAA101D now includes its specific requirements under its own heading and clause structure and then refers to the relevant parts of AS 2118.5, where applicable.

 

So that the editorial changes from this change in format are clearly separated from the additional changes made afterwards, the above revision only shows the additional changes in track changes (the editorial changes from the change in format are accepted). However, the editorial changes from the change in format can be viewed in track changes in this document here.

 

Metering

 

Due to pre-existing policies in some circumstances requiring sole-occupancy unit (SOU) water usage to be individually monitored, some water supply authorities have requested the addition of an option for the FPAA101D system to go through the SOU water meter for billing purposes (currently, FPAA101D water usage comes under the common water meter for the building).

 

This draft revision, developed in consultation with water service authorities, addresses this feedback by providing two additional options:

  1. A minor variation to the existing system configuration to provide the option to add water meters by floor (which, depending on building design and water service authorities' policies, may be enough to address the above concern); and
  2. An alternative "SOU metered" system configuration, where the sprinkler system goes through the SOU water meter (and then either continues combined or separate to the piping network for the domestic appliances).

 

Updates to Australian Standards

 

Since the publication of FPAA101D, several of the referenced Australian Standards have been amended or revised and/or are in the process of being amended or revised. As such, FPAA101D's references have been updated to reflect the amended or revised Standards.

 

Other changes

 

In addition to the above changes, a variety of editorial and minor technical changes have been made to address minor errors and issues identified with the Technical Specification since its introduction.

 

 

FPAA101H Amendment

Non-residential parts of the building having a disproportionate effect on the system

 

The major change in the draft amendment is to address the disproportionate effect that the existing requirements for non residential parts of the building have on the requirements of the FPAA101H system where these parts make up a limited proportion of the building.

 

FPAA101H currently requires the sprinkler protection of non-residential parts of the building to be hydraulically designed for the relevant hazard class as per AS 2118.1:2017, which can result in a significant increase of sprinklers required to operate-anywhere from 4 to 30 sprinklers-compared to the 2 sprinklers required for the residential portions of the building.

 

While appropriate where a significant proportion of the building is non-residential, when the significant proportion is residential, this can have a disproportionate effect on the system. This is especially the case where it triggers a building that would otherwise not require a pumpset and/or water storage tank to cover the requirements of the hydrant system or residential parts of the building to now require such equipment, creating considerable cost impacts both through the need for such equipment but also to house such equipment.

 

On review, FPA Australia has acknowledged the feedback and drafted an option for more limited system requirements that can be (but are not required to be) applied where the non-residential part of the building makes up a limited proportion of the building.

 

The limitations on the size of these parts have been aligned with the application of FPAA101D under the BCA. Also, while the limited system requirements have been similarly aligned with FPAA101D they retain a more nuanced approach consistent with the existing approach of FPAA101H to treat the different hazard classes differently (whereas FPAA101D applies a flat level of protection to non-residential parts of buildings).

 

Other changes

 

In addition to the above changes, a variety of editorial and minor technical changes have been made to address minor errors and issues identified with the Technical Specification since its introduction.